erotic


erotic
erotic, amatory, amorous, amative, aphrodisiac all involve the idea of love for the opposite sex, but they are not freely interchangeable because of differences in denotation as well as in implications.
Erotic, though the strongest in its suggestions of love as a violent passion or as a physical appetite, is rarely applied to persons as distinct from their behavior, reactions, or emotions, and it is especially used in characterizing or classifying emotions, motives, or themes in art
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erotic tendencies

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erotic music

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an erotic poet

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erotic poetry

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it was the persuasion that the deprivation was final that obsessed him with erotic imaginations . . . almost to the verge of madness— H. G. Wells

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describes his erotic adventures with prostitutes— Sat. Review

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Amatory is a synonym of erotic but weaker in its suggestion of sexual desire; it sometimes connotes little more than ardent admiration; thus, one might more correctly describe the youthful love poems of Tennyson as amatory than as erotic poetry
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Sir Lucius . . . has been deluded into thinking that some amatory letters received by him from Mrs. Malaprop are from Lydia— Harvey

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Amorous is applied chiefly to persons, their words, or their acts especially when they are falling in love or making love
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came many a tiptoe, amorous cavalier, and back retired .. . her heart was otherwhere— Keats

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yielded, with coy submission, modest pride, and sweet, reluctant, amorous delay— Milton

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the shady lawns and thickets along the river give nightly sanctuary to amorous couples— Green Peyton

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The word often suggests ripeness or eagerness for love
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the English . . . are not an amorous race. Love with them is more sentimental than passionate— Maugham

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In this sense it is also applied, chiefly in poetry, to animals
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the amorous dove— Gilbert

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Amative implies merely a disposition to fall in love or a propensity for loving; it is chiefly used in describing temperaments or in analyzing character
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that crudely amative public to which our modern best sellers appeal— N. Y. Times

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he is not normally amative

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Aphrodisiac is applied to things (as drugs or writings) that arouse or tend to arouse sexual desire
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the labored unreserve of aphrodisiac novels and plays— Montague

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Analogous words: passionate, impassioned, fervid, perfervid, ardent, fervent: *carnal, fleshly, sensual

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • erotic — ERÓTIC, Ă, erotici, ce, adj. Privitor la dragoste, de dragoste, propriu dragostei. ♦ (Despre opere literare) Care conţine sentimente de dragoste; care cântă, care exprimă dragostea. ♦ (Substantivat, f.) Totalitatea compoziţiilor literare care… …   Dicționar Român

  • erotic — [ē rät′ik, irät′ik] adj. [Gr erōtikos < erōs (gen. erōtos), love] 1. of or arousing sexual feelings or desires; having to do with sexual love; amatory 2. highly susceptible to sexual stimulation n. an erotic person erotically adv …   English World dictionary

  • Erotic — E*rot ic, Erotical E*rot ic*al, a. [Gr. ?: cf. F. [ e]rotique. See {Eros}.] Of or pertaining to the passion of love; treating of love; amatory. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Erotic — E*rot ic, n. An amorous composition or poem. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • erotic — index lascivious, lecherous, prurient, salacious, suggestive (risqué) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • erotic — англ. [иро/тик] erotico ит. [эро/тико] erotique фр. [эроти/к] erotisch нем. [эро/тиш] эротический …   Словарь иностранных музыкальных терминов

  • erotic — 1620s (implied in erotical), from Fr. érotique (16c.), from Gk. erotikos caused by passionate love, referring to love, from eros (gen. erotos) sexual love (see EROS (Cf. Eros)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • erotic — [adj] sexy amative, amatory, amorous, aphrodisiac, bawdy, blue*, carnal, concupiscent, earthy, erogenous, fervid, filthy, fleshly, hot*, impassioned, kinky*, lascivious, lecherous, lewd, obscene, off color*, prurient, purple*, raunchy, raw,… …   New thesaurus

  • erotic — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ relating to or tending to arouse sexual desire or excitement. DERIVATIVES erotically adverb. ORIGIN Greek er tikos, from er s sexual love …   English terms dictionary

  • erotic — 01. This is an [erotic] film, so it is not suitable for children. 02. The woman had a photo taken of herself in an [erotic] pose as a surprise for her husband. 03. A show of [erotic] art was shut down by the city after some people complained that …   Grammatical examples in English


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